The iPod-based interface that lost out to iOS for the iPhone

The iPod-based interface that lost out to iOS for the iPhone:

Instead of the modern touch-driven interface we now call iOS, it featured an operating system dubbed “Acorn OS” (this was an internal code name, and it unclear if it would have kept that name if it had been released), which is derived from the acorn shown on boot. It presents an on-screen click wheel, which took up the bottom portion of the screen, and on the other half of the screen, a UI identical to the one found on the beloved iPod, with options such as “Dial”, “SMS”, “Music”, “Contacts” and “Recents”, however lacking a browser option. The interface is interacted with in the same way an iPod would be operated.

Thank goodness Apple did not go with that option. The iPhone shook up the entire phone industry and, in my opinion, is single-handedly responsible for the interface of all the smartphones we use today. I had other touchscreen phones and PDAs before the iPhone came out (namely Palms and Windows Phone 5), and while they were usable, they just never worked as well as they could.

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New Beginnings

It’s been almost a year since I posted here. A lot has happened since then.

I completed the FRACP examinations. I got a new job as an Advanced Trainee in one of the specialties that I intend to specialise in (I plan on dual-specialising) at a major tertiary hospital in Melbourne. This new job necessitates an inter-state move from Newcastle. We’ve been packing, and now we’re looking for a place in Melbourne.

My wife is coming down with me. She’s leaving her job in Newcastle, and is looking for one in particular, though she has a casual vacancy job lined up already (with her credentials, she was a shoo in, even if I do say so myself). She’s very excited about the move and to start work in a new place.

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Apps for New Docs

So a few weeks ago, the hashtag #TipsForNewDocs was trending on Twitter. A portion of those tips were recommending apps for new medical interns who were due to start their orientation and “Buddy Week” (in NSW). Next week, at the beginning of February, they’ll be starting work proper, at least in New South Wales.

A lot of the apps that were recommended then, were, in my opinion, irrelevant and totally useless for interns. No intern needs to know the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, as they will be calling their registrar for any and all strokes. Similarly, the Oxford Handbook of Anaesthesia, while useful for anaesthetists and anaesthetic/critical care registrars/SRMOS, would be overkill for the brand new intern.

Those apps are useful. Extremely useful. But not for an intern in their first term. They will trying to find their legs in the brave new world that they’ve entered. They have the stems of knowledge, but not the experience of how to use all that they have learned in university. As any doctor can tell you, it’s one thing to read about it, it’s a whole different ball game when it’s in front of you. They have the lives of people in their hands and they will be afraid of making a mistake that could end up severely injuring or killing a person. I know. I was an intern once.

The apps I recommended are, in my opinion, the most useful that any intern can have available at the beginning of their career. In fact, these apps would be useful for the rest of their careers too. They’re simple, but extremely useful apps. Of course, there may be someone out there scoffing at my choice of apps. I would be happy to hear their point of view.

The following apps are available on iOS, and may be available on other mobile operating systems too.

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EDC

I got the inspiration for this post based on the EDC subreddit on, where else, Reddit. My Every Day Carry items are as follows:

(There and) Back Again

Many years ago, back in the early days of the internet and blogging, I had a blog.

It wasn’t a very popular blog, but a lot of my friends frequented it. This was back in the days after I finished my A-levels, and all the way through university. It was a form of positive reinforcement; we all blogged, and we all read each other’s blogs.

Of course, by all, I meant a big enough number, but not everyone. Yet, they were all my friends. Are my friends.

But over the few years after that, as life caught up with us, we stopped. Slowly, gradually, but definitely, we stopped. One of my friends, the most prolific blogger we had, last updated her blog on the 27th of March, 2012. She hasn’t posted since.

Other reasons as to why we stopped blogging included the rise of Facebook. It provided an easy means for us to update the world with our various thoughts, without the cost and effort required to maintain a blog. Twitter made posting little updates that didn’t require any long, drawn out process easy.

Yet, somehow, both Facebook and Twitter made blogging less personal. More personal, yet less personal. We felt free to post whatever we wanted with little effort, but within the confines of the individual formats. We could share every individual aspect of our lives with everyone in the world, but within the ecosystem of Facebook only. We had audience engagement of a scale unprecedented in history for the common person, but at the same time, our posts were drowned out amongst the posts of everyone else in the individuals timelines.

There are many reasons as to why I chose to start blogging again. Mostly, because I just wanted to. I wanted a place where I could write about and link to whatever the heck I wanted. Sure, maybe I’ll get some readers. Most probably, I won’t. I’m not in this to make money. I’m not in this to get recognition. I’m in this because it’s fun.

Sure, I won’t be updating it every day. Maybe once a week. Maybe once a month. Maybe longer. Maybe a few times a day. It all depends if I feel like it. If I feel like there’s anything to blog about. If I feel it’s worth the effort. If I feel it’s worth my time.

I will end my first post here. Stay tuned for more.